Location: Urbisaglia, Italy

June 4, 2018 to June 29, 2018

Session dates: 
June 4 - June 16 (2 weeks); June 4 - June 23 (3 weeks); June 4 - June 30 (4 weeks); June 11 - June 23 (2 weeks); June 11 - June 30 (3 weeks); June 18 - June 30 (2 weeks)

Application Deadline: 
Saturday, March 31, 2018

Program Type

Field school

RPA certified



Università degli Studi di Macerata (Italy)

Project Director:

Prof. Roberto Perna

Project Description

For those seeking experience in archaeological fieldwork, the University of Macerata in Central Italy is now welcoming applications from students of all levels to participate in a major Roman excavation. The site of Urbs Salvia, the modern Urbisaglia (MC), colonia romana of the 2nd century BC, is located along the via Salaria Gallica, which connected Ausculum and the via Salaria with the via Flaminia, along the Adriatic coast. First called Pollentia and re-baptized Urbs Salvia at the time of Augustus, the town has been intensively explored since 1995. The archaeological excavations brought to light a major complex comprising a Cryptoporticus-temple, dedicated to the Salus Augusta. The nearby Amphitheatre, Theatre, the ancient fortifications and the sub-urban villa of Villa Magna, the focus of recent digs, have been encluded in the Archaeological Park of Urbs Salvia founded in 1994 (http://lnx.whipart.it/artivisive/3892/ritrovamento-archeologia-marche-vi...).


The excavations run in June from the 4th to 29th and participants must stay for a minimum of two weeks; you are welcome to stay for the entire duration of the dig if you so choose. The fees are 500 EUR (circa 600 USD or 440 GBP) for 2 weeks and 800 EUR for 4 weeks  (circa 950 USD or 700 GBP). This includes all tuition, pottery labs, accommodation and all the lunches from Monday to Friday according to your length of stay. The deadline for applications is the 31th of March and those who apply will find out the results within one week of their application. Application forms (in attachment) and further details about this program (and related activities) should be sent by email to Dr Jessica Piccinini.


The Archaeological Park of Urbs Salvia is close to Chiaravalle Abbey in Fiastra and the Macerata a medieval medium-sized town (45.000 inhabitants) in the Marches region, in the very heart of Central Italy, close to the Adriatic coast (30 minutes by car/bus) and not far from important cities like Rome (less than 3 hours by car/train), Florence (3 hours) or Bologna (2 hours). Well connected with an intense net of transports (coaches and trains), Macerata’s location is ideal for reaching all that the province has to offer during your weekends. The Adriatic Sea Coast, ski resorts, and the National Park of The Sibillini Mountains are all relatively nearby. The area is characterised by its excellent quality of life and food, provided by the province’s clean air, parks, and its peaceful yet lively atmosphere felt in all of the cities and towns dotted around the local landscape.

The University of Macerata was founded in 1290 and is one of the oldest universities in Europe. Its main activities are focused on the humanities and social sciences.

Duties: from Monday to Friday, 7.30 am-2.00 pm fieldwork activities and 3.00 pm-5.30 pm labs.



Period(s) of Occupation: Roman

Project size: 
1-24 participants

Minimum Length of Stay for Volunteers: 2 weeks

Minimum age: 

Experience required: 

Room and Board Arrangements

Accommodation either in a 19th rustic villa within the archaeological park and at a close distant to the site of Villa Magna or in a flat in Macerata. Facilities provided include the internet, a kitchen and local transports (if your accommodation is in Macerata). Lunch from Monday to Friday is also offered.

Cost: 500 EUR (roughly 600 USD or 440 GBP) for 2 weeks and 800 EUR for 4 weeks  (950 USD or 700 GBP).

Academic Credit

Name of institution offering credit: 
Università degli studi di Macerata
Number of credits offered: none


Contact Information
Jessica Piccinini
Università degli studi di Macerata - Dipartimento di archeologia e antichità